Spain’s Glovo inks real-estate tie-up to add more dark stores for speedy urban delivery – TechCrunch

Spain’s Glovo, an on-demand delivery app, has announced a strategic partnership with Swiss-based real estate firm, Stoneweg.

The deal will see the latter invest €100M in building and refurbishing “prime city real estate” in some of Glovo’s key markets as the delivery app works to build out its network of dark stores and sign up more retail partners for its urban delivery service, it said today.

The initial focus for the partnership will be on growing its dark stores network in Spain, Italy, Portugal, Romania, with additional countries slated as under review in Europe.

“These are the countries in which both Glovo and Stoneweg have a major presence, and therefore are able to move much quicker when it comes to setting up,” a Glovo spokeswoman told us. “However, the deal is not limited to these countries. Glovo’s aim is to grow and strengthen their Q-Commerce and dark kitchens infrastructure across

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Developers: How observability complements the future of monitoring

Commentary: Those who say observability killed monitoring aren’t paying attention. Here’s why.

Image: monstArrr_, Getty Images/iStockphoto

You can be forgiven if you thought monitoring was passé. Nagios, for example, is probably the best known of the open source monitoring tools, but interest in it has steadily declined for over a decade. Meanwhile, observability tools like OpenTelemetry are hot, though “observability” is arguably a cool new term for much the same metrics, logs, and traces that we’ve been analyzing long before the term was coined. 

Indeed, as Lightstep CEO Ben Sigelman has argued, observability isn’t going to replace monitoring “because it shouldn’t.” Observability is all about augmenting monitoring, not replacing it. Here’s why.

SEE: Editorial calendar: IT policies, checklists, toolkits, and research for download (TechRepublic Premium)

Thinking differently about monitoring

Must-read developer content

I suggested above that observability is really just a fancy way of saying “logs, traces, and

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Samsung vice chairman Jay Y. Lee sent back to prison in bribery case – TechCrunch

Samsung Electronics vice chairman Jay Y. Lee is back in prison following a retrial of his 2017 conviction in a bribery case that helped lead to the downfall of former South Korean president Park Guen-hye. The Seoul High Court sentenced Lee to 30 months on Monday.

Lee was originally convicted of bribery in 2017 and sentenced to five years, but was released in 2018 after the sentence was reduced and suspended on appeal. In August 2019, however, South Korea’s Supreme Court overturned the appeals court, ruling that it was too lenient, and ordered the case to be retried.

Lee was expected to become chairman of Samsung after the death of his father, Lee Kun-hee, in October 2020. He has served as the chaebol’s de facto leader since his father suffered a stroke in 2014. With Lee’s sentencing today, it is unclear who will take over his responsibilities at Samsung.

Charges

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After a record year for Israeli startups, 16 investors tell us what’s next – TechCrunch

Israel’s startup ecosystem raised record amounts of funding and produced 19 IPOs in 2020, despite the pandemic. Now tech companies across industries are poised for an even better year, according to more than a dozen investors we talked to in the country.

Mainstay sectors like cybersecurity continue to matter, they said, but are maturing (more about that here). Some people are more excited by emerging areas like artificial intelligence, which has been a focus of the country’s military for years, and like cybersecurity is now producing many fresh teams of founders. Other investors felt that a broader range of industries, like fintech and biotech, would eventually produce the biggest companies in the country.

Overall, local investors cited the country’s focus on global markets from day one, general support from the Israeli government and deep relationships with Silicon Valley and other global tech centers as additional factors that are

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CES 2021 wrap up: How enterprise tech makes all those smart toilets and robots possible

From smart toilets and disinfecting robots to transparent OLED displays and sleep tech, CES 2021 was a showcase for the latest innovations in consumer and enterprise technology.

CES 2021 is a wrap. And although this year’s all-digital event was a significantly different experience from past shows, there was plenty of innovative tech on display. TechRepublic’s Steve Ranger, Teena Maddox, and Bill Detwiler join Karen Roby to discuss the products and technology trends that stood out. The following is a transcript of their discuss edited for readability.

Smart toilets, disaffecting robots and a flying Cadillac

Karen Roby: Teena, let’s start with you, just general impressions from the show and some things that maybe stood out to you.

Teena Maddox: Sure. As always, it was an interesting CES, full of really cool products. Even though this one was virtual, we still managed to find some really great things to write about for

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